Tuesday 12 December 2017

Natural Gas (LNG) Export (10)

Dominion has told the Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC) that it plans to emit eight times as many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as it's currently allowed from its fracked gas export terminal in Cove Point, Maryland — raising expected VOC emissions from 2.53 tons per year to 20.1 tons per year!   Dominion is asking to have its existing permit changed to remove any numeric limit of VOC pollution and also to change the way the pollution would be monitored. If this application is approved, it could set a precedent for other dangerous gas infrastructure projects.   Please send the PSC a comment today urging it to deny this application!   Hundreds of people came to a public hearing on this issue on October 2. Speaker after speaker testified against Dominion's permit change, but now we need to follow that up with submitting as many comments as possible. The more the PSC hears that this is a terrible idea, the more likely it is to reject Dominion's request.   All comments must be received by the PSC by 5 p.m. on Monday, October 16.   The PSC only accepts comments that are written and mailed, so please send yours today to the address below. Alternatively, you can submit comments electronically at bit.ly/novocpollution, and We Are Cove Point will print them up and mail them in for you!   To send a comment directly to the PSC, make sure to include the permit number 9318 and mail it to: David J. Collins, Executive SecretaryMaryland Public Service Commission6 Saint Paul StreetBaltimore, MD 21202-6806  Much…
Dominion Energy’s Coal Ash Pond Pollution In Virginia, both the James and Potomac Rivers are being severely impacted by coal ash pollution. Earlier this summer, the James River Association (JRA) objected to Dominion Energy’s draft permit to dewater coal ash ponds at Dominion’s Chesterfield Power Station on the Lower James River. Lower James Riverkeeper Jamie Brunkow points out in public comments that the permit fails to protect the river and its ecosystems, while threatening public health. More recently, JRA, along with Southern Environmental Law Center took samples at four locations near the Chesterfield Station. The results revealed high levels of coal ash contaminants, like zinc, nickel, copper, lead and arsenic in the water. This month, a Virginia state board will vote on the draft permit governing the dewatering of the Chesterfield coal ash ponds. In addition, Potomac Riverkeeper Network’s challenge of the wastewater permit for Dominion’s Possum Point plant, on Quantico Creek near the Potomac River, goes to court later this month. Tests show coal ash contaminants in drinking water wells near Possum Point. READ MORE… Sewage Overflows in Baltimore City Back in 2002, Baltimore City entered into a binding agreement (a consent decree) with the U.S. Department of Justice and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to fix its failing sewage system by January 2016. The agreement required Baltimore City to repair essential infrastructure in the City’s sewage system to prevent raw sewage from entering waterways and neighborhoods – bringing Baltimore City into compliance with the Clean Water Act. Although Baltimore City made some progress in the intervening 14…
Federal regulators are in place to regulate. We are disheartened that, regarding the Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas export facility in Lusby, MD, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) not only arrived at a “Finding of No Significant Impact,” but that the D.C. Circuit Court upheld that decision in a recent ruling. FERC had an obligation to protect the residents of Maryland and people who live in the Chesapeake Bay region. Waterkeepers Chesapeake is committed to protecting water quality throughout the watershed, whether it be from energy interests that include hydraulic fracturing or “fracking,” or other extraction industries that pollute our most precious natural resource: water. For more information on the case, please visit our Waterkeepers Chesapeake blog. Court's Opinion